RECIPE

Piadina with Prosciutto and Marscapone

Mario Batali has shared this Piadina recipe with us from his book, Italian Grill! Piadina are a favorite snack in Romagna, the eastern part of Emilia-Romagna, where you will find them in every panini bar. Traditionally they were cooked on special embossed tiles, which imprinted them with a decorative pattern.

Ingredients

  • Piadina Dough (see below)
  • 12 thin slices prosciutto di Parma
  • 1 1/2 cups mascarpone cheese (12 ounces)

For the Piadina Dough:

  • 4 1/4 cups cake flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2/3 cup lard or vegetable shortening, cut into tablespoons and chilled
  • 1 cup ice water

Preparation

Pre-heat a gas grill or prepare a fire in a charcoal grill. Place a piastra on the grill to pre-heat.


Cut the piadina dough into 12 pieces. On a lightly floured surface, using a lightly floured rolling pin, roll each piece into a 6-inch round and place on two baking sheets or trays.


Working in batches, place the rounds on the piastra and cook until light golden brown on the first side, about 1-2 minutes. Turn and repeat on the other side. Transfer to the baking sheets.


When all are done, slice each round horizontally in half with a serrated knife: hold the round with your non-cutting hand as you carefully cut it into two even halves. Place a slice of prosciutto on the bottom half of each one and smear 2 tablespoons of the mascarpone on the other half. Replace the top halves and press gently together.


Place the piadine on the grill for a minute or two to rewarm them, then wrap in a napkin and serve.


Piadina Dough:

This dough uses baking powder rather than yeast for leavening. If you can get high-quality lard, do try it – lard always makes the best pastry and dough. This recipe makes about 2 pounds.


Combine the flour, baking powder and salt in a food processor and zap to mix. Scatter the pieces of lard over the flour and pulse just until incorporated. With the motor running, add the water and process just until the dough begins to clump together.

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